10 Facts About Pet Food That Will Surprise You

Choosing a good pet food that is nutritious and healthy for your fur baby can be challenging to say the least. There are so many commercial pet foods that are (for want of a better term), nothing but dry kibble – lacking all of the essential nutrients your fur kid needs.

However, there are some pet food manufacturers that do value the health of your pet, and strive to create feed that is healthy and nutritious. It just becomes a matter of learning how to sift the wheat from the chaff, so to speak.

With that said, here are 10 surprising facts about commercial pet food that just might surprise you. Take them to heart, and keep them in mind when choosing the best pet food for your four-legged companion.

Not All Pet Foods Are Created Equal

In fact, some may be seriously subpar. There are certain pet foods that are manufactured from what is known as 4D meat. Worse, this practice is perfectly legal. 4D meat comes from diseased and disabled animals who are dying or have died. Sound yummy?

Yeah, doesn’t sound too appetizing to us either. You wouldn’t eat meat like this, so don’t feed it to your pet. Instead, make sure that the pet food you are buying is “fit for human consumption.”

Consider Feeding Your Pet “Fresh” Food

Or at least feed them fresh food part of the time. Unfortunately, whether you’re buying canned food or dry kibble, the process that makes them stable enough to sit on a shelf for months on end is so extreme that most of the time any natural nutrients that may have been present get eradicated.

This means that manufacturers are forced to add things back in, like synthetic minerals and vitamins and even artificial flavors, just to entice your pet to eat it.

Read the Ingredients. Really!

We bet you only thought you’d have to read ingredients for your own food. Unfortunately, no. Read the ingredients in your pet food of choice, and see how it measures up. Ideally you want the first ingredients to be proteins, not grains and starches.

In fact, you might consider going grain-free entirely. Often grains are corn or cornmeal based, which is highly fattening and offers very little nutritional value.

Sometimes veggies like garbanzo beans and peas may be added in as starches, and those are acceptable. Just make sure they aren’t the first ingredient listed.

Avoid “Meat Meal”

Yes, you want the first ingredients to be protein, but you don’t want that protein to be meat meal. Meat meal is basically an animal by-product, and you probably don’t want to know what goes into its production. Suffice to say, avoid, avoid, avoid.

Added Preservatives Are Unhealthy

Unfortunately, they are necessary for most commercial pet food brands, so that the food can store for indeterminate periods of time. There are some natural preservatives, but they increase production costs, which make them largely undesirable to pet food manufacturers.

Also, it’s worth noting that some preservatives are also used as pesticides, and some are even known to cause health risks, yet they are still used. Even if the preservative agent is illegal in other countries, it could still be legal here in the good old US of A.

Raw Food, Shmaw Food

There’s a belief that is being passed around that raw foods are bad for your pet and you shouldn’t feed them such nonsense. We call baloney.

Obviously, pet food manufacturers have a vested interest in making people believe kibble and canned food is better than raw or real food. It doesn’t make it true.

Just like we can thrive on a raw food diet, animals can as well. So even if you feed your pet commercial food a few times a week, then mix it up with fresh food the other days of the week, you could potentially offset nutritional deficiencies.

Protein Extenders = Bad

Protein extenders are used to save on costs. For instance, blood meal is considered a “protein extender.” However, it is essentially indigestible for your furry friend. What is blood meal, you might ask? It is blood that has been dried and powdered, and then used in various brands of pet food. The other problem with blood meal is that it has the potential to pass along mad cow disease to dogs.

Buyer Beware of Heavy Metals

Metals such as lead, mercury, and cadmium have been found in commercial pet foods. Obviously, this is not desirable, nor healthy. 

Nutrient Poison

Another fun factoid: because the manufacturing process depletes nutrients, pet food manufacturers will add back in synthetic nutrients. Sometimes this can be overkill, and even toxic to your animal, such as too much vitamin A or vitamin D.

To Meat or Not to Meat…

Because too much meat can mess with a manufacturers machines, most dry kibbles are made up of about 50% of the good stuff. If it’s the good stuff. See point number 1.

Remember to research your options, and choose your pet food wisely.

Your Dog’s Kibble Isn’t Enough: The Truth About Commercial Pet Food

When it comes to your fur baby, (and obviously, the key word here is “baby”), you want to feed them as healthy a diet as possible. For most pet owners, their dog is like a member of the family, and you certainly wouldn’t feed other members of your family only unhealthy foods or an unbalanced diet.

Therefore, why would you sacrifice quality and nutrition when it comes to your four-legged friend? Unfortunately, most commercial dog food does just that… sacrifices quality and balanced nutrition, at the expense of you and your dog.

A healthy diet equals a healthy (and long) life. In a day and age where 40% of dogs have packed on more pounds than is optimal, and 46% of dogs today die from diseases like cancer, you should want to give your pet the best chance possible at a long and healthy life. Heart, liver, and kidney disease is on the rise, and it all boils down to being mindful of just what you are feeding your pet.

Much like humans, what you put into your dog is what comes out. If you feed them a poor diet every day, it can manifest itself into various illnesses and ailments. Not the goal when you go to pick up that bag of dog food, right?

So, let’s talk about a few truths when it comes to commercial dog food, so you can see how so many of them miss the mark when it comes to nourishing your furry little cuddle buddy.

Complete and Balanced is a Best Guess

Just because something says it, doesn’t make it true. While it would be nice to believe that one single brand of dog food can meet all the nutritional needs of your dog, the reality is that is most likely not the case.

There is no single brand of dog food that will meet all of your dog’s nutrient needs all the time. Therefore, food rotation and supplementation is encouraged. Which leads us to truth number two.

It’s Healthier to Mix It Up

It’s perfectly fine to mix your dog’s food up. As a matter of fact, it’s important to mix it up for your dog, to ensure that the diet they are being fed truly is “balanced and complete.”

If you think about it, would you like to eat the same thing day in and day out? Probably not. So, if you wouldn’t, why would your dog?

They need variety too, and the message that switching their feed could give them a bellyache, while potentially true in the short-run, isn’t necessarily a bad thing. An upset stomach can actually be a sign that your dog has nutritional deficiency somewhere, and needs a wider variety of food.

Just like people, when your dog is not nutritionally sound, his gut will not work optimally. Once your dog gets the complete nutrition he needs, and his gut heals and begins to work the way it’s designed to do, then he can eat different foods on a regular basis with no issues, just the way we as people do.

Dry Dog Food or Canned?

Dry dog food (also called kibble) can be quite dehydrating. It has been linked to bloat as well as other health problems in both dogs and cats. Dry dog food is exposed to extreme heat during the production phase. Extreme heat causes a loss of potency in the nutritional value, in some cases destroying up to 75% of nutrients and vitamins.

Canned food is a tad bit more “fresh”, and less heat is used to create it, increasing its nutritional value. However, there’s still nothing that beats real (fresh) food for your pet.

Whether it’s cooked or raw, dehydrated, freeze-dried, or frozen… these forms offer much higher nutrition options for your fuzzy pal, and should be weighed carefully against the kibble brands you choose if you want to feed your pet the healthiest diet available.

Filling Your Dog Up With Corn

If you read the ingredients on the back of the food bag, you’ll find that the first one is most often corn, or some derivative of corn. This is because it’s a cheap filler, and lowers the costs of production.

Dog’s bodies are not designed to properly process corn by-products. Corn has even been identified as a possible allergen for dogs. When the main ingredient in your dogs food is corn or a corn by-product, you are feeding your pet a food that will not be easily digested or absorbed in their gut.

You will typically find corn used as a filler in the cheaper, low cost dog foods. To ensure that your dog is receiving wholesome nutrition, and not being filled up with corn at every meal, be sure to do your research and check the label for nutrition information! Your furry four-legged family member will not receive complete, balanced nutrition on food with grain filler as the main ingredient!

Dog Food “Good”, People Food “Bad”- Not!

Obviously, there are some foods that a dog cannot and should not eat. Things like grapes, raisins, onions, macadamia nuts, and garlic to name a few. Also, never give your dog any foods with Xylitol (it can be deadly), and stay away from allowing them chocolate as well. Other than those few no no’s, for the most part dogs can eat the same foods as humans do and be all the healthier for it.

Think of it like this… feeding your dog some commercial dog foods is similar to feeding your dog granola bars every day. Since we already know eating only processed food on a daily basis is not healthy for you, it stands to reason that a “processed food only” equivalent is also not healthy for your dog.

As more research is conducted on the proper diet for dogs, we are learning that a processed food only diet is no longer enough. Processed foods make for a longer shelf life and ease of feeding and convenience, but lack the complete proper nutrition necessary. We now understand that dog’s need whole food nutrition for optimal health and wellness!

Animal By-Product… What is It?

If you tend to feed your dog the cheaper brands, you can bet the cheaper the brand, the cheaper the ingredients will be. Corn and cornmeal will usually be the very first ingredient listed with “animal by-product” as the protein source. This kind of dog food is lacks proper, complete nutrition and can potentially lead to of health problems and diseases.

Keep in mind that the final rendered product that comes out of these many manufacturers of pet food is supposed to be labeled properly, and list its dominant animal source. However, it is hard to identify the main animal source when several different meats are used. As a result, food often gets labeled with terms like “meat by-product” or “animal by-product” as well as “animal fat”. Pretty ambiguous, right? It doesn’t tell you much.

Another unfortunate problem with this practice is that the meat sources can be contaminated. When companies chose to use ingredients such as “meat by-product” or “animal by-product”, these mix of animal species could have been on unknown drugs or antibiotics that can potentially be passed through the food to your pet!

Frankly, some commercial grade dog food is made of material that is considered “unfit for human consumption” … yet somehow it is deemed okay to feed to your dog. It is important to be aware of what you are feeding your dog!

What You Can – and Should Be Doing

This information may be startling, to say the least, but this is not to scare you away from feeding your furry four-legged friend his pet food! What you should take away from all of this information is how necessary it is to take the time to do research on what the best option is for your pet.

This is why you should always check the labels and ingredients of the dog food that you choose to buy, and try to find the brands that truly value animal life. They are out there, you just have to look for them. You also will probably pay a little more for them, but the health of your dog is worth it.

Do your due diligence! Research different dog food brands to compare what they have to offer. Select one that has high quality standards and creates their food recipes based on research and the help of nutritionists. Try to find brands of dog food that have wholesome nutrition and natural ingredients. Take the time to find options that are grain free and do not use any fillers. This can be time consuming, but well worth it for your fur friend’s health!

There are pet food companies that truly want to help you nourish your dog so that you can equip them to live a long and healthy life. Stay far away from the subpar cheaper brands that rely on fillers and by-product to keep costs low. Strive to make the health of your pet top priority and purchase the highest quality food that you can reasonably afford.

Skin Conditions in Dogs & Cats

Nothing is worse than when our fur kids aren’t feeling well and we aren’t quite sure what’s wrong with them. When they experience illness, there are certain physical symptoms that may alert us to what’s wrong. However, there are some ailments and side effects that are more discreet, which we might miss upon first glance. Or, there are times when cats and dogs try to hide symptoms from their owners.

Even though our fur children may be able to communicate with us, they still can’t tell us exactly where it hurts. Animals can face some of the same illnesses, conditions, and allergies that humans do, but are limited in their ability to communicate their feelings. This is why it’s important that fur parents take extra precautions when it comes to the care of their beloved fur kid.

Although some side effects may be temporary and go away on their own, other conditions may be permanent or lead to more serious health issues if not given the proper attention and care.
It’s important to keep an eye out for changes in outward appearance and/or behavior in pets to ensure they are kept safe. Let’s take a look at a few of the most common skin conditions in dogs and cats.

Skin Conditions in Cats

Cats can be elusive animals and have been known to hide their symptoms quite well, especially when they’re not feeling well. Skin conditions are a different story since they can’t be hidden as easily. Even if your cat isn’t the cuddly type, make sure you hold him every once in a while to at least check their skin for any abnormalities. Below are a few cat skin conditions to make note of:

Open Sores

Maybe your fur kid likes to be extra frisky playing outdoors, running after squirrels, or climbing up trees. It may be common to see scratches or other minor injuries on his paws or face after being outside. However, open sores or lesions are still something you’ll want to keep an eye on to make sure they heal on their own.

Open sores can easily become infected when they fail to scab over – leaving them more susceptible to bacteria and disease. In fact, persistent sores may be the symptom of something larger. If you’ve noticed sores on your furry friend that haven’t gone away in a few days, make an appointment with your veterinarian to check for allergies or infectious disease.

Hair Loss

Hair loss or alopecia in fur parents can be caused by a variety of things. One of the most typical factors being stress or anxiety. Similarly, hair loss in your fur baby can be indicative of stress, allergies, or other types of illness or infection in the body.

Of course, you’ll notice your cat shedding (how can you ignore the never-ending hair clumps hidden all over your house), but if the hair is falling out in bigger clumps or more than usual, it’s something to be wary of. Your pet may not seem to be in pain, but this side effect could be related to a much larger diagnosis, such as pancreatic tumors or adrenal disease.

Allergies

It may be strange to think about cats having allergies when usually they are the ones to cause allergies in others, but it occurs more frequently than you might think. There are three major types of allergies they can suffer from, including food allergies, environmental allergies, and flea allergies.

A cat with food allergies will most likely experience obvious reactions, such as vomiting or diarrhea, after eating the offending food. Food allergies for felines often occur when they have a hypersensitive reaction to protein. Do you suspect allergies in your fur child? Mention the symptoms on your next visit to your veterinarian. Seemingly unrelated actions could all stem from one common allergy.

Dull Coat

A change in appearance of your cat’s coat can indicate the presence of a more serious skin condition. The appearance maybe greasy, flaky, or dull. In some instances, you may notice your cat has discontinued grooming, which leaves the fur looking mangy, dry, or matted.

A cat’s diet could be the culprit for this skin condition. For example, a lack of omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids could dull your cat’s fur. Fish sources are a common source of omega-3s and help moderate inflammation. Plants provide omega-6 fatty acids for pets and are important to maintain the skin’s cell membrane. Lack of either of these in the diet can result in a negative change in your pet’s outward appearance.

Ear Mites

They sound as invasive as they are (yuck!) The tiny parasites feed off the oil and wax inside your pet’s ear. If that’s not bad enough, this causes inflammation, which can develop into a more serious ear or skin infection.

Symptoms that indicate your fur child might have ear mites include excessive shaking or head shaking and/or a dark substance coming from the ears accompanied by an unpleasant odor. Check out your cat’s ears from time to time and make sure to schedule routine visits to the veterinarian for nose-to-tail checkups.

Feline Acne

Believe it or not, cats can get pimples too. While they may not experience the somewhat embarrassing outbreaks their fur parents have, feline acne is a common skin condition that spreads around your fur baby’s chin. However, much like humans, feline acne is caused by stress, an adverse reaction to medication, or poor grooming. Most cats are self-groomers, so you don’t normally have to worry about it. But if you see your fur kid isn’t taking care of his fur as diligently as before, acne may sprout up unexpectedly.

Dog Skin Conditions

Everyone’s had to deal with a scratching dog at one point or another, but many chalk it up to fleas or “just being a dog”. Although that may very well be the case, there are several other types of skin conditions your furry friend may be suffering from, which can cause this incessant itching.

Allergic Dermatitis

“Allergic dermatitis” is just a fancy word for skin allergies. Your dog may have an allergic reaction to grooming or bathing products, a change in food or treats, or environmental factors like insects or pollen.

If your fur kid is constantly scratching and is starting to show signs of redness or rashes, he may need to be treated for allergies.

Impetigo

This bacterial infection is visible on the surface of the skin and has the appearance of pimple-looking bumps, which are filled with pus. The condition is most often found in puppies and show up where there is little to no fur.

Although not immediately serious, impetigo can prove uncomfortable for your pet and should be treated right away. In most cases, the bumps can be treated with a topical solution before the bacteria spreads or becomes a bigger problem.

Ringworm

Ringworm is one of the more prevalent skin conditions dogs can get. Contrary to it’s name, the condition itself is not an actual worm, but a fungus. It is noticeable by its ring shapes that show up on the head, paws, ears, or legs.

In addition to hair loss, your dog may experience inflammation or scaly patches where the fungus lives. You will want to seek treatment for ringworm right away, as it can easily spread not only to dogs or other fur friends, but also to humans.

Your veterinarian can prescribe an anti-fungal treatment to take care of it, but you’ll want to limit your fur kid’s interaction with others until your pup has healed.

Hot Spots

The clinical term for hot spots is “acute moist dermatitis”, which refer to sections of the skin that are red and inflamed. Most often, they’re found on your fur child’s head or chest and feels hot to the touch.

Hot spots can result from allergies, infections, or excessive chewing or licking of the skin. It’s important to keep the section as clean as possible, but if this condition continues, your best bet is to pay your vet a quick visit.

Other Signs and Symptoms of Skin Conditions in Pets

There are several other symptoms (other than those listed above) that may alert you that your fur kid is suffering from a skin condition or other health issue.

Does your fur kid drag his back legs on the carpet? Does your cat or dog constantly lick raw patches onto his paws? Does your fur child sneeze, scratch, or itch a lot? Although the behavior may seem harmless, if it happens regularly, it’s worth having checked out. It’s also a good idea to keep a look out for:

● Dandruff
● Flaking
● Scaling
● Hair loss
● Inflammation
● Strong odor
● Increased oiliness

There may need to be an adjustment to your fur kid’s diet, shampoo, or other products you use daily. Allergies may develop over time or may change with the seasons. Knowing your fur baby’s habits is what will help most to control issues and prevent conditions and diseases from developing further.

How to Remedy Skin Conditions in Pets

The best thing to do if you notice a skin abnormality, rash, or unusual bumps is to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. A doctor can properly analyze the symptoms associated you’re your fur kid’s physical condition and eliminate any chance of the skin condition being an indicator of a larger problem. They’ll already have a history of your pet’s health and can help put your mind at ease.

If you cannot get to the veterinary clinic right away or you want to try an at-home remedy for more short-term skin conditions such as a mild allergic reaction to certain plants or products, then consider the following:

• Vitamin E for dry skin. When your pup experiences dry, flaky skin, you can pamper your pet with a massage. Apply vitamin E directly into the skin or add it to part of your fur kid’s bath. It will help soothe the skin and make it healthier.

• Applying certain foods as a topical solution can help with your pet’s skin conditions as well. Chamomile tea, for example, can be used as a natural disinfectant for minor skin irritations on your fur baby. Chill the tea first and spray onto your pet’s skin for a soothing effect.

• Oatmeal also helps ease the skin, especially from a rash or allergies that make your fur child extra itchy. Oatmeal is often used in human bath products for its mellow nature that is gentle on the skin and helps with irritation. Why shouldn’t we use it for our fur kids, too?

What Kind of Pet Care Routine Should You Follow?

Ensure your pet is receiving a balanced diet. Make sure your fur baby receives his daily dose of nutrients every day. Read the labels of all the food and snacks you feed your pet to check for fillers, dyes, or other potentially harmful ingredients. If you have more than one pet in your household, they may be allergic or have adverse experiences to different things. It’s important to keep food and drink separate for each fur kid.

Take your pet for regular checkups. Just like humans should visit the dentist twice a year or go to the doctor for yearly physicals, regular checkups for your fur baby is just as important. Even if there are no major changes to report, it’s a good idea to be preventative rather than waiting and having to be reactive when thing go wrong. Be proactive for the health of your pet.

Know your fur baby like the back of your hand. Before even getting a pet, research the breed you want and what kind of conditions their breeds might be more susceptible to. For example, a puppy with lots of skin folds may collect debris, dirt, and oils within the skin that can lead to skin conditions. The more you know in advance, the better you can care for your pet in the future. It can help you know what to look out for as your pet grows.

How to Pet-Proof Your Apartment

Getting a fuzzy new roommate is an exciting adventure, but there are a few steps you should take to ensure that your apartment isn’t totally thrashed, making it look worse than a college dorm room. Not only do you want to provide a hazard-free environment, but you also want to ensure that your pet feels right at home. Here are a few easy ways to prep your apartment for your newest roomie.

Paws Off

Puppies and kittens are notoriously curious, leading them to open any cabinets, cupboards, or cubbies they can get their little paws on. Even mature fur kids can be intrigued by their new space, sending them on a hunt through your precious belongings. Not only is it a nuisance to come home to the contents of the bathroom cabinet dispersed all over the floor, but it is also potentially dangerous for your pet.

When your fur child gets into your belongings, they will likely lick, chew, or attempt to play with their newest treasures. Items such as cleaning products, prescriptions, and even certain foods can be extremely harmful to your furry friend. Take preventative measures by putting childproof locks on cabinets that house these dangerous products.

Fragile Finds

In addition to chemical products, the Pinterest-inspired decor you worked so hard on could be potentially harmful. Any fragile items that could be knocked over and shattered should be put away or out of reach. Remember that cats are climbers and can jump up on very high surfaces, so it’s safest to remove dangerous materials altogether.

Any pointy, sharp items should be removed from your fur kid’s environment so that they don’t chew on them and cut themselves. Think of this as an opportunity to de-clutter last season’s mason jars and revamp your apartment with pet-friendly décor.

Cut the Cord

Electrical cords can also come as a shockingly scary surprise to curious, teething pets. Eliminate this risk by unplugging any unused cords, and covering cords that you need plugged in at all times.

Protective cord covers can be found at your local hardware store, or you can try coating your cords with a bad tasting spray that your fur kids will be sure to avoid. In addition to electrical cords, the cords hanging from blinds can be a chocking hazard, especially for climbing kitties. Tie your cords up in a loop to keep them out of reach.

Plant Proof

Many plants are poisonous to dogs and cats, and unfortunately, many pets love chewing and digging through them. Even non-poisonous plants can be harmful, causing vomiting or diarrhea. It’s important to do your homework on what houseplants are pet-safe before bringing your new best friend home.

Check out the ASPCA’s list of toxic and nontoxic plants to see if your windowsill garden is in the clear. After reading through the list, replace your dying lilies with pet-friendly plants, or better yet, a treat like cat-grass. Cat-grass is a healthy mix of grasses including wheat, oat, and rye, which your kitty will love to chew on.

Who Let the Dogs Out?

Another way to ensure your pet’s safety is to provide them with a secure space that will keep them from running away. It may take a little time for your apartment to feel like your pet’s true home, and you want to ensure that there isn’t a way for them to sneak out. Inside, check that your screens, windows, and doors are secure. If your fur kid is a scratcher, you may need to get a plastic or metal grate to cover screens so he cannot push through it.

If your fur child spends just as much time outdoors as they do lounging around inside, it’s important to pet-proof your yard. Make sure that there aren’t any holes in or under the gate, and that the fence is high enough to keep your fur baby in.

If you have a pool, it is important to make sure that this is gated off as well. Another huge factor is eliminating potential poisons. Remove any toxic plants and check that poisonous pesticides aren’t being used in your area. If you do not own your apartment, you should check with your property manager to see if any harmful chemicals are being used.

Dumpster Diving

Although we tend to avoid the trash at all costs, many pets think the trashcan is a treasure trove of new smells and things to explore. To prevent your fur kid from eating harmful items or decorating your kitchen floor with food scraps, make sure all of your trashcans have secure lids. The same rules apply for litter boxes if you have a cat and you are getting a dog.

When it comes to your fur child’s safety, a little preparation goes a long way. Keep your furry friend happy and healthy, while keeping your apartment disaster free by pet-proofing your space before bringing home your new roommate.

5 Tips for Keeping Your Pet’s Coat Silky & Shiny

Is your fur kid’s coat looking a little less like a Pantene commercial and a little more like they just finished a tough mudder? There are a number of dietary, health, and grooming factors that could be hindering the silky shine of your furry friend’s coat. As a fur parent, there are five easy tips you can use to keep your pets looking like they just stepped off the runway.

Get Grooming

Could you imagine going for weeks without brushing your hair? Surprisingly enough, your fur children don’t want to go without regular grooming either. Regardless of your pet’s fur type, brushing every few days is an effective way to give his coat a healthy boost.

By grooming your fur kid a couple times a week, you are helping to evenly distribute the oils throughout the coat, increasing its natural shine. In addition to combing the oils throughout the coat, grooming also helps to eliminate buildup of tangles, dirt, dander, and dead skin cells. Integrating regular grooming into your pet care routine is a simple solution to a dull, tangled coat.

Splish Splash

Another quick way to enhance your fur kid’s coat is by making sure they are properly bathed. However, sometimes less is more when it comes to bath time. When a pet’s coat becomes dull, owners often think that a bath is the solution, but excessive bathing can be part of the problem.

A good rule of thumb is making sure that your fur baby receives a bath at least once a month. Over-washing can strip the fur of natural oils and lead to skin irritation. Keep an eye on your pet’s coat and skin, and use a special shampoo for sensitive skin if you notice dryness. It is also important to thoroughly rinse all shampoo and conditioner from your fur child’s coat, as any residue can cause irritation or make the coat appear dull.

You Are What You Eat

Lack of vitamins and nutrients in your pet’s food is one of the top reasons why your fur kid’s locks aren’t looking very lustrous lately. Similar to our food, the more processed the food, the more nutrients that get lost along the way. Look for pet food that is rich is natural proteins and is free of preservatives as well as allergy inducing corn, soy, and wheat products.

The Missing Link has identified that a primary cause of health problems in pets is a poor diet, lacking balanced omega-6 and omega-3. Try treating your fur kid to an omega rich snack like fish to give them a tasty, healthy boost.

The Perfect Balance

Due to commercial processing, there is a significant gap between the nutrients in most off-the-shelf pet foods compared to what your pet would be consuming in nature. Because sending your pets off to fend for themselves in the wild isn’t the safest solution, you can bring the great outdoors to them by supplementing their food with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

Although many pet foods claim to have these ingredients, the processing that they go through leads to an imbalance and lack of natural nutrients. The Missing Link has pinpointed this gap and created a preservative, pasteurization, sterilization, and heat free process to deliver these crucial supplements to your pets, restoring their coat.

The Missing Link provides Ultimate Skin & Coat supplements for dogs, cats, horses, and small animals. By enhancing your pet’s food with omega-3 and omega-6 supplements, you can help restore their coat’s silky shine.

Happy & Healthy

The overall health of your four-legged friend could also be impacting the appearance of their coat. Pay attention to key health indicators such as unusual sluggishness, excessive thirst, irregular diet, vomit, diarrhea, and bad breath. If you notice any of these in your fur kid, it’s safest to consult with a veterinarian to identify the larger problem.

For example, arthritis is a common occurrence in elderly pets, and this may be impacting their ability to groom themselves. If you know that your fur kid is struggling with arthritis, try brushing them daily to compensate for their lack of grooming. Another common problem is parasites. When your pet is exposed to parasites such as worms, these unwanted visitors will eat your pet’s food, leaving them void of proper nutrients.

Similarly, sore gums or unhealthy teeth can hinder your fur child’s ability to eat, impacting their vitamin intake. By keeping a close eye on your pet’s overall health, you may be able to pinpoint the cause of a lackluster coat.